Dating from lower class protocol

Small groups of students travel from station to station together, performing some kind of task or responding to a prompt, either of which will result in a conversation.

Variations: Some Gallery Walks stay true to the term , where groups of students create informative posters, then act as tour guides or docents, giving other students a short presentation about their poster and conducting a Q&A about it.

From that spot, students take turns defending their positions.

Variations: Often a Philosophical Chairs debate will be based around a text or group of texts students have read ahead of time; students are required to cite textual evidence to support their claims and usually hold the texts in their hands during the discussion.

Variations: When high school English teacher Sarah Brown Wessling introduced this strategy in the featured video (click Pinwheel Discussion above), she used it as a device for talking about literature, where each group represented a different author, plus one provocateur group.For each strategy, you’ll find a list of other names it sometimes goes by, a description of its basic structure, and an explanation of variations that exist, if any.To watch each strategy in action, click on its name and a new window will open with a video that demonstrates it. Basic Structure: Stations or posters are set up around the classroom, on the walls or on tables.On seminar day, students sit in a circle and an introductory, open-ended question is posed by the teacher or student discussion leader.From there, students continue the conversation, prompting one another to support their claims with textual evidence.

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